Tag Archives: In the News

Marketing in the News–October 2020

COVID-19 still dominating headlines as lockdowns continue, advances in vaccination are made and tests and studies reveal new data about the virus. Check out these Tantor titles and inform yourself on past viruses, vaccination debates, pandemic prevention, and response, and the current COVID world.

The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age, by Nathan Wolfe, Link

Viruses, Plagues, and History: Past, Present, and Future, by Michael B. A. Oldstone Link

The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science, and Fear, Seth Mnookin, Link

Economics in the Age of COVID-19, by Joshua Gans, Link

 

Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present, by Frank M. Snowden, Link

Epidemic: Ebola and the Global Scramble to Prevent the Next Killer Outbreak, by Reid Wilson, link

The U.S. Navy made headlines in September by releasing new evidence  on the sinking of the USS Thresher, discovering a sunken WWII era submarine, reporting Russian naval activity in the Black Sea reminiscent of Cold War Era maneuvering and introduced a shifting strategy for maintaining America’s global naval primacy. Take a deeper dive into these Naval headlines with these Tantor titles:

The Death of the USS Thresher: The Story Behind History’s Deadliest Submarine Disaster, by Norman Polmar, Link

Wahoo: The Patrols of America’s Most Famous World War II Submarine, by Richard H. O’Kane, Link

Against the Tide: Rickover’s Leadership Principles and the Rise of the Nuclear Navy, by Rear Adm. Dave Oliver, USN (Ret.), Link

Crashback: The Power Clash Between the U.S. and China in the Pacific, by Michael Fabey, link

Oceans Ventured: Winning the Cold War at Sea, by John F. Lehman, Link

 

Long time Supreme Court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, died on 09/18/2020. Her death puts the Court, the presidential nomination and Senate confirmation hearing at the center of election focus. Take a look at the history of the Supreme Court, some biographies of current and former justices and a few of the key issues the courts could be ruling on in the upcoming session with these Tantor titles:

Scalia’s Court: A Legacy of Landmark Opinions and Dissents, by Antonin Scalia, Kevin A. Ring, Link

Injustices: The Supreme Court’s History of Comforting the Comfortable and Afflicting the Afflicted, by Ian Millhiser, Link

Breaking In: The Rise of Sonia Sotomayor and the Politics of Justice, by Joan Biskupic, Link

 

The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind–and Changed the History of Free Speech in America, by Thomas Healy, Link

Packing the Court: The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court, James MacGregor Burns, Link

A People’s History of the Supreme Court: The Men and Women Whose Cases and Decisions Have Shaped Our Constitution, by Peter Irons, Link

Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution, by Myron Magnet, Link

The Second Amendment: A Biography, by Michael Waldman, Link

 

There has been a series of new archaeological findings that has led to an uptick of interest in Viking culture, its history and its place in Western culture. Learn more about Vikings and their influence with these books:  

 

The Vikings: A New History, by Neil Oliver, Link

Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland, by Bryan Sykes, Link

Medieval Maritime Warfare, by Charles D. Stanton, Link

The Vikings: A History, By Robert Ferguson, Link

Scandinavians: In Search of the Soul of the North, by Robert Ferguson, Link

The Normans: From Raiders to Kings, by Lars Brownworth, Link

 

Looking ahead, October is filled with historical anniversaries and is dedicated to bringing awareness and appreciation to unique issues and themes. Fill your shelves with some of these titles:

Oct. 1st, 1908 :  Henry Ford’s Model T, a “universal car” designed for the masses, went on sale for the first time. See how Ford assembled his Model T and transformed transportation in America.

I Invented the Modern Age: The Rise of Henry Ford and the Most Important Car Ever Made, by Richard Snow, Link

Oct. 4th, 1957: The Space Age begins as the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the world’s first satellite. Learn how the space race started and see how the super powers competed to control outer space:

A Ball, a Dog, and a Monkey: 1957—The Space Race Begins, by Michael D’Antonio link

 

Oct. 8th, 1918 – During the battle of Argonne Forest in France, during World War I, U.S. Sergeant Alvin C. York single-handedly took out a German machine-gun battalion, killing over a dozen and capturing 132. Download renowned historian Martin Gilbert’ history on World War I now:

The First World War: A Complete History, by Martin Gilbert, Link

Oct. 16th, 1793: Queen Marie Antoinette was beheaded during the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution. Learn all about this tumultuous revolution with:

The Coming of the Terror in the French Revolution, by Timothy Tackett, Link

Oct. 18, 1945 – The Nuremberg War Crimes Trial began with indictments against 24 former Nazi leaders including Hermann Göring and Albert Speer. Take a first-hand look at these trial with this title:

Letters from Nuremberg: My Father’s Narrative of a Quest for Justice, by Christopher J. Dodd, Lary Bloom, link

Oct. 27, 1787 – The first of 85 Federalist Papers appeared in print in a New York City newspaper. The essays argued for the adoption of the new U.S. Constitution. Get both points of view with these titles:

The Federalist Papers, by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, Link

The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, edited by Ralph Ketchum, Link

Oct. 28th, 1919: October 28, 1919 – Prohibition began in the U.S. with the passage of the National Prohibition (Volstead) Act by Congress. Distill the truth about America’s “noble experiment” with this title:

Prohibition: A Very Short Introduction, by W. J. Rorabaugh, Link

Marketing the News July 2020

As the global pandemic persists, tensions between the U.S. and China grow politically, militarily  economically, culturally and clandestinely. Check out these titles and learn more about modern China, its growing influence in regional and global affairs and the U.S strategy to combat the threat.

How Asia Works: Success and Failure in the World’s Most Dynamic Region, by Joe Studwell, link

The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage, By: Alexandra Harney, link

China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, By: Arthur R. Kroeber,  link

China’s Next Strategic Advantage: From Imitation to Innovation, by George S. Yip, Bruce McKern, link

China, Inc., By: Ted C. Fishman, link

Asian Waters: The Struggle over the South China Sea and the Strategy of Chinese Expansion, By: Humphrey Hawksley, link

Chinese Communist Espionage: An Intelligence Primer, By: Peter Mattis, Matthew Brazil, link

In the Dragon’s Shadow: Southeast Asia in the Chinese Century, by Sebastian Strangio, link

The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, the Factory, and the Future of the World, by Dexter Roberts, link

 

As delayed primaries continue all over the country and with the general election looming a rising debate on mail-in voting and potential voter fraud is gaining national attention. Learn all about voting rights, electoral history, and current voter trends with these books:

Down for the Count: Dirty Elections and the Rotten History of Democracy in America, By: Andrew Gumbel, link

Electoral Dysfunction: A Survival Manual for American Voters, By: Victoria Bassetti, link

It’s Time to Fight Dirty: How Democrats Can Build a Lasting Majority in American Politics, By: David Faris, link

The Fight to Vote, by Michael Waldman, link

They’re Not Listening: How the Elites Created the Nationalist Populist Revolution, By: Ryan James Girdusky, Harlan Hill, link

Anything for a Vote: Dirty Tricks, Cheap Shots, and October Surprises in U.S. Presidential Campaigns, by Joseph Cummins, link

Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, by Ari Berman, link

Inside the Mind of a Voter: A New Approach to Electoral Psychology, By: Michael Bruter, Sarah Harrison, link

100 Years of the Nineteenth Amendment: An Appraisal of Women’s Political Activism, link

 

New discoveries made in Mexico shed light on some Aztec folklore and the Spanish conquest. Learn more about pre-Columbian South America and the social history of the region with these listens:

Walking the Americas: 1,800 Miles, Eight Countries, and One Incredible Journey from Mexico to Colombia, by Levison Wood, link

Conquistador: Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs, by Buddy Levy, link

Empire: A New History of the World: The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Civilizations, By Paul Strathern, link

Fifth Sun: A New History of the Aztecs, by Camilla Townsend, link

It’s summertime and the U.S National Parks are in the news. Congress passes funding legislation and protective measures for Parks and monuments in a rare bi-partisan vote, rescues become frequent in the warm months and keep rangers busy and a python hunt in the Everglades earn a few women some local notoriety. Learn more about our public lands and all those Americans who work at, play in and protect our National Parks:

Death in Yellowstone: Accidents and Foolhardiness in the First National Park, by Lee H. Whittlesey, link

Death, Daring, and Disaster: Search and Rescue in the National Parks, by Charles R. “Butch” Farabee, Jr., link

 Deep into Yellowstone: A Year’s Immersion in Grandeur and Controversy, by Rick Lamplugh, link

 Empire of Shadows: The Epic Story of Yellowstone, by George Black, link

Rangers, Trappers, and Trailblazers: Early Adventures in Montana’s Bob Marshall Wilderness and Glacier National Park, by John Fraley, link

The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, by Terry Tempest Williams, link

 The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise, by Michael Grunwald, link

 

Using food to study and record history is becoming a norm for geneticists, academics, and chefs alike. Follow the global cuisine timeline and take a deep dish dive into the food we eat with these titles:

The Food of a Younger Land: A Portrait of American Food—Before the National Highway System, Before Chain Restaurants, and Before Frozen Food, When the Nation’s Food Was Seasonal, Regional, and Traditional—from the Lost WPA Files, by Mark Kurlansky, link

A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment, by Stephane Henaut, Jeni Mitchell, link

A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression, by Jane Ziegelman, Andrew Coe, link

An Edible History of Humanity, by Tom Standage, link

Fruit from the Sands:The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat, by  Robert N. Spengler III, link

The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African-American Culinary History in the Old South, by Michael W. Twitty, link

The Taste of Empire: How Britain’s Quest for Food Shaped the Modern World, by Lizzie Collingham, link

 

Marketing In the News- June 2020

Looking at June, consider looking back and learning more about these historical events:

June 1st, 1801, Founder of Utah and patriarch of the Mormon church Brigham Young) was born in Whittingham, Vermont. From modest beginnings to the “American Moses” learn why Brigham Young holds an esteemed place in American history with:

Brigham Young: Pioneer Profit, by John G. Turner, Link

 

June 6, 1944 – D-Day, the largest amphibious landing in history, began in the early-morning hours as Allied forces landed in Normandy on the northern coast of France. Consider this invasion from the other side with:

Countdown to D-Day: The German Perspective, By: Peter Margaritis, Link

June 15, 1215 – King John set his seal to Magna Carta, the first charter of British liberties, guaranteeing basic rights that have since become the foundation of modern democracies around the world. There is a reason there has only been one King John, find out why with:

King John: Treachery and Tyranny in Medieval England: The Road to Magna Carta, By: Marc Morris, link

 

June 17, 1972 – Following a seemingly routine burglary, five men were arrested at the National Democratic Headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. Get the facts from the woman who reported on this scandal with:

Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, By: Elizabeth Drew, link

 

June 18, 1815 – The Battle of Waterloo ends with Napoleon’s defeat and the end of his empire. Learn more about this epic battle with:

The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo, By: Brendan Simms, link

 

June 28, 1914 – Archduke Francis Ferdinand, Crown Prince of Austria and his wife were assassinated at Sarajevo, essentially starting World War I, 5 years later to the day The Treaty of Versailles is signed ending the war. Learn all there is to know about The Great War with:

First World War for Dummies, By: Dr. Sean Lang, Link

 

 

Raise some awareness and show appreciation, in June we celebrate these special days:

 

World’s Ocean Day, June 8th

Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain’s Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans, by Cassandra Phillips, Capt. Charles Moore, link

Sailing a Serious Ocean: Sailboats, Storms, Stories and Lessons Learned from 30 Years at Sea, By: John Kretschmer, link

Oceana: Our Planet’s Endangered Oceans and What We Can Do to Save Them, by Michael D’Orso, Ted Danson, link

 

Father’s Day 21st

Dude, You’re Gonna Be a Dad!: How to Get (Both of You) Through the Next 9 Months, By: John Pfeiffer, Link

Dad Tired and Loving It, By: Jerrad Lopes, Link

Golfing With Dad, By David Barrett, Link

 

June recognizes soul food, steakhouses, and country cooking:

The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African-american Culinary History in the Old South, by Michael W. Twitty, link

Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America, By: Jim Auchmutey, Link

The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance, by Thomas McNamee, link

 

June is LGBT Pride Month:

Rainbow Warrior: My Life in Color, by Gilbert Baker, link

Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution, by David Carter, link

Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women, and the Rest of Us, By: Kate Bornstein, Link

What’s Your Pronoun: Beyond He and She, by Dennis Baron, link

Harvey Milk: His Lives and Death, by Lillian Faderman, link

June is National Great Outdoors Month & National Camping Month:

Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail, by Ben Montgomery, Link

How to Shit in the Woods: An Environmentally Sound Approach to a Lost Art, by Kathleen Meyer, link

Finding Your Way Without Map or Compass, by Harold Gatty, link