Picks of the Week-April 5

Well hello there, Spring! The temps are getting warmer and the birds are chirping. It’s the perfect time to start listening to a fresh new find while you go exploring or do your spring cleaning. We understand that at times it could be a challenge narrowing down your next listen, so we had our acquirers narrow down some of their top picks for you.

Forgotten Peoples of the Ancient World

A chronicle of forty forgotten ancient civilizations which highlights the important contributions that each has made to modern society.

Note: Fans of The Horse, The Wheel, and Language by David W. Anthony can continue their journey through early history with Philip Matyszak’s Forgotten Peoples on the Ancient World.- Greg Souza

Publishing Date: 4/13/21

Written by: Philip Matyszak

Read by: Michael Page

The Little Princesses: The Story of the Queen’s Childhood by Her Nanny, Marion Crawford

Originally published in 1950, The Little Princesses was the first account of British Royal life inside Buckingham Palace as revealed by Marion Crawford, who served as governess to princesses Elizabeth and Margaret.

Note: Perfect for fans of The Crown!  Hear about the Queen and Princess Margaret’s childhood straight from their childhood nanny. Originally published in 1950 this was the first book to ever be published by a palace insider. This is a must listen for anyone interested in the British Royals! -Jannah McCowan  

Author: Marion Crawford

Narrator: Sophie Roberts

Pub Date: 4/13/21

Sweetness in the Blood: Race, Risk, and Type 2 Diabetes

In a rousing indictment of the idea that notions of biological race should drive scientific inquiry, Sweetness in the Blood provides an ethnographic picture of biotechnology’s framings of Type 2 diabetes risk and race and, importantly, offers a critical examination of the assumptions behind the recruitment of African American and African-descent populations for Type 2 diabetes research.

Note: Sweetness in the Blood is an eye-opening examination of diabetes as well as a criticism of ethnographically focused research. Readers will be captivated by the historical analysis of biomedical research in relation to race. -Maddy Collins

Publishing Date: 4/20/21

Written by: James Doucet-Battle

Read by:  Terrence Kidd

The Bus

Detailing a six-hour window on April 21, 1941, The Bus features eight different narrators on a bus from the Scheuern institution to the Nazi euthanasia clinic in Hadamar, Germany. Contains mature themes.

Note: Describing the hours leading up to the arrival of 41 patients to be euthanized at Nazi Germany’s Hadamar Clinic from Scheuern Institution on April, 21, 1941, The Bus is told from the point of view of six mental patients, the physician whose job it is to kill them, and the man whose job it is to burn all the corpses that come out of the gas chamber. Soothed into submission by the promise that they can shower when they arrive at Hadmar, each patient reflects on their lives before Scheuern, while, in many cases, dearly missing the family members who gave them up to the Nazis for perceived imperfections that lead them to become institutionalized and ultimately exterminated. The physician struggles to reconcile what he must do versus what he knows to be moral and the man who operates the oven harbors his own secrets. An #ownvoices story, Adam Pottle’s writing offers a terrifying glimpse into the human toll of the Holocaust. It is devastating in its truth and beautiful in its detail of the humanity of the victims who perished. -Kim Budnick

Publishing Date: 4/20/2021

Written by: Adam Pottle

Read by: Suzanne Elise Freeman & Aaron Shedlock

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